Rockfish Group Page

Acadian redfish is one of three redfish species common in the Northwest Atlantic. Atlantic redfish are also commonly called ocean perch, although they're actually a species of rockfish. Pacific ocean perch is one of about 70 varieties of rockfish found along the West Coast of North America. Although nicknamed rockfish, Atlantic striped bass is actually a member of the temperate bass family and lives along the East Coast.

Acadian redfish

Acadian redfish

U.S. commercial fishermen harvest this firm, white-fleshed fish from Maine to New York. An important commercial species since the 1930s, redfish were heavily exploited through the 1950s when their population plummeted. Thanks to a number of strict fishery management measures as well as a rebuilding plan implemented in 2004 and the significant sacrifices of fishermen, the Acadian redfish population rebounded and was declared fully rebuilt in June 2012.

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Atlantic striped bass

Atlantic striped bass

Striped bass can be wild-caught or farmed. Most farmed striped bass are actually a cross between striped bass and white bass. Wild striped bass, often called “striper” or “rockfish,” are caught along the East Coast, mainly in Virginia and Maryland. Striped bass, once overfished, are now abundant following the enforcement of strict management practices for both commercial and recreational fisheries.

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Pacific ocean perch

Pacific ocean perch

Harvested commercially by the United States, Canada, and Russia, Pacific ocean perch is a delicate, nutty-flavored fish. The meat is lean and fairly firm and has a fine flake. While abundant in Alaska, Pacific ocean perch is rebuilding off the West Coast. This is one of the most important commercial species in the northeast Pacific and makes up the majority of the rockfish catch in Alaska.

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Widow rockfish

Widow rockfish are an important commercial groundfish species and are one of about 70 kinds of rockfish found along the West Coast and Alaska. Most major catches of the species began in the late 1970s, and peaked in the early 1980s. The fishery quickly expanded, and West Coast widow rockfish populations were declared overfished in 2001. Fishery managers put a rebuilding plan in place in 2001, and with the help of strict management measures, the stock was declared rebuilt in 2011.

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