Latest Research

The subject of the benefits and risks of eating seafood is a compelling and ongoing scientific issue. Around the world, researchers and health and medical professionals continue to conduct studies to expand what we know about this subject. Here is a round-up of some of the latest, peer-reviewed research on the subject:

This Is Your Brain on Fish

8.7.14
A study published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine found that people who regularly eat fish have more voluminous brains than those who do not—in such a way that stands to protect them from Alzheimer's disease. The study found that eating fish—baked or broiled—is associated with larger gray matter volumes in brain areas responsible for memory and cognition in healthy elderly people.

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Low dietary intake of seafood linked to cognitive decline

4.28.14
New research from Tufts University, presented at the Experimental Biology 2014 meeting, finds that low dietary intake of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids can predict cognitive decline.

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Omega 3 acids good for blood pressure

3.10.14
A new study published in the American Journal of Hypertension has found that consuming omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA, often found in fatty fish and fish oil supplements, can be as effective or more effective in controlling blood pressure than diet and exercise.

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Pregnancy Fears About Fish Unfounded

10.11.13
Women should eat more fish, not less, during pregnancy, according to the results of recent studies. A study from the University of Bristol suggests that concerns about mercury levels in fish may be unfounded, while the Nutrimenthe project reports that women who eat plenty of oily fish during pregnancy give birth to better behaved children.

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EATING FATTY FISH ONCE A WEEK FOR 10 YEARS CUTS RISK OF Rheumatoid ARTHRITIS

8.14.13
A new study finds that eating a weekly portion of salmon or other fatty fish, such as trout or mackerel, could reduce your risk of developing rheumatoid arthritis by more than half. In a study published Monday in the Annals of Rheumatic Diseases, the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm found that the omega-3 fatty acids in fish can cut the risk of chronic inflammatory disease by 52 percent.

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Fish Oil Consumption Linked to Lower Breast Cancer Risk in Study

6.27.13
The consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids found primarily in fish is linked to a 14 percent decline in breast-cancer risk, according to a new study funded by the National Natural Science Foundation of China, Ministry of Education of China, and National Basic Research Program of China.

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Farmed Salmon Raises Blood Levels of Omega-3s

6.6.13
People who eat farm-raised salmon can increase their intake of beneficial omega-3 fatty acids to levels that may help reduce their risk of heart disease, according to studies by U.S. Department of Agriculture scientists.

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A New Endorsement for Fish

4.1.13
Scientists have turned up ample evidence that consumption of seafood high in omega-3 fatty acids may help protect against cardiovascular disease. But the data have usually been indirect, gleaned from food questionnaires used to estimate consumption. A new analysis relying on blood tests and years of clinical exams confirms that higher blood levels of omega-3 fatty acids may reduce the risk for heart disease and death in people over age 65.

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Study suggests timing may be key in fish-asthma link

11.13.12
Among thousands of Dutch children included in a new study published in Pediatrics, those who first ate fish between the ages of six months and one year had a lower risk of developing asthma-like symptoms later on than babies introduced to fish before six months of age or after their first birthdays.

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Fish again linked to lower stroke risk

10.16.12
Increased intakes of fish, and the omega-3 fatty acids they contain, may reduce the risk of stroke, says a new study.

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Mother's fish, mercury intake tied to kids' ADHD risk: study

10.9.12
Researchers writing in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine found that eating at least two servings of fish per week was linked to about a 60 percent lower risk of kids developing certain ADHD-like symptoms. But elevated mercury levels, which can also come from eating more fish - depending on the fish - were tied to a higher risk of developing the symptoms, such as hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness.

Though the study did not prove cause and effect, and did not use a formal diagnosis of ADHD, it may offer insights into a condition that's estimated to have an impact on one in 10 children in the United States. Researchers noted that this is only one study and the results should be confirmed.

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Eating fish linked to lower risk of stroke

10.6.12
Eating fish from time to time may reduce risk of stroke, particularly ischemic stroke, according to a new study in European Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Compared with those who never ate or ate fish less than once per month, those who ate 1 to 3 times per month, once per week, 2 to 4 times per week, and 5 times per week were at 3 percent, 14 percent, 9 percent and 13 percent reduced risk for stroke, respectively.

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Omega-3 may slow aging process, study finds

10.3.12
Hoping to extend your life? Eat more cold water fish such as tuna or salmon and consume less corn oil. According to new research out of Ohio State University, in the category of omega fatty acids, you're advised to take more omega-3 and less omega-6, those fatty acids derived from such foods as corn oil, sunflower oil and safflower oil. Omega-3 fatty acids, found naturally in certain fishes as well as in dietary supplements, may have a restorative effect on ever-shortening telomeres — those DNA sequences that are known to diminish as we age.

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Omega-3 Benefits of Fish Outweigh Mercury Concerns

9.25.12
The hazards of eating mercury-laden seafood has made headlines over the past few weeks; however, a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition suggests the heart-health benefits from omega-3 fatty acids outweigh the risks of mercury content at low levels.

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Fish tied to lower colon cancer risk: study

5.10.12
People who eat plenty of fish may have a lower risk of colon and rectal cancers, a new report published in the American Journal of Medicine suggests.

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Omega-3s shown to help protect against harmful effects of smoking: scientists

4.23.12
While the best way to protect yourself from the harmful effects of smoking is to quit, researchers from Greece have found that omega-3 fatty acids can help repair arteries damaged by the unhealthy habit.

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Early Omega-3 May Protect against Myocardial Infarction

3.2.12
Cardiologists from Sydney University and the University of California have found that omega-3 fatty acid supplements in the first five years of life may protect against myocardial infarction and stroke in later life.

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A Diet Rich in Fish May Help the Aging Brain

2.28.12
New research suggests eating fish and other foods rich in omega-3 fatty acids could help people maintain healthy brains as they age, as well as protect their hearts.

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EAting Fish Tied to Lower Risk of Colon Polyps

2.25.12
Women who eat about three servings of fish per week have a somewhat lower chance of having polyps found during a routine colonoscopy than women who eat just one serving every two weeks, according to a new study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.

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Women Who Eat Fish During Pregnancy 'More Likely to Have Brainy and Sociable Children'

2.1.12
Women who eat fish during pregnancy are more likely to have brainy and sociable children, according to new EU-funded research. Those mothers-to-be who ate oily fish such as tuna, sardines, and salmon produced infants who scored better in various tests of skill and intelligence.

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Lower Risk of Heart Failure in Women Who Eat Baked or Broiled Fish Often

1.7.11
A potentially effective approach to lowering the risk of heart failure might be to increase the consumption of fish or long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (n-3 LC-PUFAs) found mainly in fatty fish. Several prospective observational studies have reported a lower risk of heart failure in individuals with high fish or n-3 LC-PUFA intakes.

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Lower Risk of EArly Age-Related Macular Degeneration in Women Who Eat Fish Often

1.7.11
Like several chronic diseases, age-related macular degeneration (AMD) shares links with the amount of fish we consume. People who eat more fish are less likely to develop AMD than those who avoid fish.

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Omega-3s May Cut Postpartum Depression Symptom Risk

1.7.11
Women would be wise to eat at least a serving of high-omega-3 fish 2 to 3 days per week to improve post partum mental health. Although fish oil supplements may be more acceptable to some women, the real thing is clearly the more nutritious option as a serving of fish is also protein- and mineral-rich. Clearly, fish as a "brain food" is gaining the nod from not only from the general public, but scientists as well.

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Report of the Joint Expert Consultation on the Risks and Benefits of Fish Consumption

1.1.10
The World Health Organization and Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations found that healthy dietary patterns that include fish consumption and are established early in life influence dietary habits and health during adult life.

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