• Picture of a seafood market

    Public Comment Open on Traceability Program

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    2015 Fishery Management Council Appointments

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    Overfishing and Overfished Numbers at All-Time Low

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  • Picture of a Gag grouper

    Gag Grouper and the Status of our Fisheries

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    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

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Sustainability Facts

You might think that fresh fish is superior to frozen fish. But today, most frozen fish compares in quality to fish that’s never been frozen. Fresh catches are immediately processed and frozen at very low temperatures, and this often happens right on board the vessel where the fish is caught. When shopping for frozen seafood, there are several things you can do to ensure you get the best product possible.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

How can a small tag provide big insights into the behavior, interactions, and movements of fish species? Advances in acoustic and satellite technologies are allowing researchers to track animals large and small across great distances, even in challenging ocean environments. Scientists from NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center have implanted hundreds of acoustic tags into salmon and tracked the fish down several rivers and bays out to the Gulf of Maine. The tags allow scientists to collect information they didn’t have access to before—details on animal movements, migrations, and interactions at sea.

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