• Picture of habitat

    Healthy Habitat: Key to U.S. Seafood and Fisheries

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  • Greater Amberjack Info Now on FishWatch

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  • Image of Silver Hake

    Silver Hake Info Now on FishWatch

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  • Picture of a harbor

    NOAA Reports Show Strong Continued Improvements

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  • Picture of seafood

    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

Ever wonder whether U.S. farm-raised fish and shellfish are safe to eat? Yes, they are safe. In fact, United States laws governing the harvesting and processing of seafood are among the most stringent in the world. Several federal government agencies and individual states are responsible for monitoring and controlling seafood safety for consumers. The primary federal agencies involved with seafood safety include the Food and Drug Administration, NOAA, USDA, and the Environmental Protection Agency. Consumers also play an important role in seafood safety. When shopping for seafood, be sure to know what you're looking for and understand how to best handle, store, and cook your seafood.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

When you walk along a sandy shoreline, you might not realize that you're strolling through a crucial habitat for marine species. A recent NOAA study in the Gulf of Maine sought to identify essential fish habitats and their importance in the life cycles of 16 local commercially caught fish and invertebrate species. Sand, gravel, salt marshes, eel grass, and algae ranked as some of the most important. These areas are used to lay eggs, to hide from predators and as nurseries for juveniles. A better understanding of where animals live can help fisheries scientists be more aware of threats to these key areas and how to best manage fisheries with habitat in mind.

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