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    Input Needed to Fight IUU Fishing, Seafood Fraud

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  • Picture of a fishing boat

    Overfishing and Overfished Numbers at All-Time Low

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  • Picture of a Gag grouper

    Gag Grouper and the Status of our Fisheries

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  • Listening for Cod

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    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

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Sustainability Facts

You might be wondering, what’s a stock assessment, anyway? A stock assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing, and reporting demographic information to determine changes in the abundance of fishery stocks in response to fishing and, to the extent possible, predict future trends of stock abundance. Managers use stock assessments as a basis to evaluate and specify the present and probable future conditions. Conceptually, this is similar to NOAA’s National Weather Service dynamic atmospheric models, which use multiple weather observations to calibrate complex atmospheric models that forecasters can use to make informed predictions.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

What’s the impact of fishing traps lost in ocean and coastal waters? Not only are these traps costly to fishermen, they are difficult to recover. The traps can continue to catch crabs and other commercial species—known as “ghostfishing”—as they sit on the seafloor. Researchers are testing innovative gear technologies and modifications that could help fishermen hold onto their traps, preventing impacts from the derelict gear on the fishery, marine wildlife, their habitats, and the economy.

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