• Atlantic Bluefin Tuna: Stock Assessment Says…

    Atlantic Bluefin Tuna: Stock Assessment Says...

    MORE...
  • Aquaculture map

    Marine Aquaculture in the U.S.

    MORE...
  • Catching your own seafood

    Catching Your Own Seafood

    MORE...
  • An End to Overfishing

    An End to Overfishing

    MORE...
  • Picture of seafood

    Get To Know Your Seafood

    MORE...
 

The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

Ever think about where your farmed seafood comes from? Buying farmed seafood grown in the United States is good for you and good for the country. From a seafood safety standpoint, the United States has some of the strictest environmental and food safety rules and regulations found anywhere in the world. Buying U.S.-grown farmed fish and shellfish guarantees that your seafood meets rigorous state and federal standards and supports American jobs.

LEARN MORE...




 

Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Something you may not know about mussels—when they are grown in nutrient-rich offshore waters, they filter their food directly from the water. This eliminates the need to add food to the system, and it can help improve water quality. NOAA Fisheries supported research in New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Massachusetts that tested technology for developing the first shellfish aquaculture project permitted in U.S. federal waters. The project, which will begin operating next spring, is a collaboration between scientists and fishermen to grow blue mussels in a 30-acre area in Nantucket Sound.

LEARN MORE...