• Image of fish larvae

    Scientists Study Ecosystem Effects on Fish Populations

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  • MAFAC Sustainable Seafood Certification Recommendations

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  • Pollock is Pollock

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  • A Changing Climate in Fisheries Management

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  • Picture of seafood

    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

You might be wondering, what’s a stock assessment, anyway? A stock assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing, and reporting demographic information to determine changes in the abundance of fishery stocks in response to fishing and, to the extent possible, predict future trends of stock abundance. Managers use stock assessments as a basis to evaluate and specify the present and probable future condition. Conceptually, this is similar to NOAA’s National Weather Service dynamic atmospheric models, which use multiple weather observations to calibrate complex atmospheric models that forecasters can use to make informed predictions.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Picture of a bluefish

Did you know that non-native species can impact a marine ecosystem? Blue and flathead catfish are an example in the Chesapeake Bay. Introduced as a recreational species from the 1960s to 1980s, the population and range of these catfish have increased dramatically since that time. As top predators in several river systems, they may be contributing to changes in the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. Ongoing research funded by NOAA Fisheries is looking into the impacts of this species on the ecosystem and options for mitigating those impacts.

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