• Florida Chef Wins 2014 Seafood Cook-Off

    Florida Chef Wins 2014 Seafood Cook-Off

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  • Pacific Blue Marlin Info Now on FishWatch

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  • Picture of habitat

    Healthy Habitat: Key to U.S. Seafood and Fisheries

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  • Picture of a harbor

    NOAA Reports Show Strong Continued Improvements

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  • Picture of seafood

    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

How much of a role do fisheries play in the U.S. economy? More than you might know. Fisheries, whether for commerce or recreation, play an enormous role in the U.S. economy. In 2012, U.S. commercial fishermen landed 9.6 billion pounds of seafood valued at $5.1 billion. Fish processors, icehouses, restaurants, grocery stores, bait and tackle shops, fuel stations, and a multitude of other businesses benefit from healthy commercial and recreational fishing.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Many people use probiotics on a daily basis to stay healthy. But, did you know that probiotics can be great for marine species as well? Already used in lobster and shrimp farming, scientists are currently developing new probiotics for use in oyster farms. Because antibiotics are not allowed in U.S. aquaculture due to concerns about antibiotic resistant pathogens, probiotics are a good option to keep farmed organisms healthy. The hope is that probiotics could help more oyster larvae survive the transition from the free swimming stage to the settled stage. This summer NOAA’s Aquaculture Lab in Connecticut is testing the new probiotics, which could potentially be on the market in 2 to 3 years.

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