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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

Ever wonder what type of fish and shellfish are farmed in U.S. waters? Freshwater aquaculture produces primarily catfish, trout, and tilapia. Two-thirds of marine production is shellfish such as oysters, clams, and mussels. The other third is finfish, but the U.S. has few commercial finfish farms. Existing farms are located in state waters in Maine, Washington, Hawaii, and on land in ponds and tanks in several states. Species produced include Atlantic salmon, steelhead trout, coho salmon, cod, sturgeon, red drum, Pacific threadfin (moi), Hawaiian yellowtail, and cobia.

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Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Healthy fish habitats are critical to fisheries and the seafood they produce. In the United States, roads and transportation infrastructure are critical to the nation’s economy. This infrastructure and related construction can have a variety of impacts on fish habitat by stirring up sediments that can irritate a fish’s gills, smother eggs, or prevent typical migration patterns. In the Northeast United States, NOAA Fisheries is coordinating with the Federal Highway Administration to develop consistent guidelines to help minimize these environmental impacts and protect fish habitats, and that’s good news for fish and the seafood industry.

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