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    2015 Fishery Management Council Appointments

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    Overfishing and Overfished Numbers at All-Time Low

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  • Picture of a Gag grouper

    Gag Grouper and the Status of our Fisheries

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  • Listening for Cod

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    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

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Sustainability Facts

Ever wonder what type of fish and shellfish are farmed in U.S. waters? Freshwater aquaculture produces primarily catfish, trout, and tilapia. Two-thirds of marine production is shellfish such as oysters, clams, and mussels. The other third is finfish, but the U.S. has few commercial finfish farms. Existing farms are located in state waters in Maine, Washington, Hawaii, and on land in ponds and tanks in several states. Species produced include Atlantic salmon, steelhead trout, coho salmon, cod, sturgeon, red drum, Pacific threadfin (moi), Hawaiian yellowtail, and cobia.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

NOAA scientists are looking at pollock surveys in a different way. While they’ve been conducting fish surveys in Alaska’s Shelikof Strait for decades, just recently they adapted their approach. Rather than surveying the fish using sonar from a ship, scientists moored three sonar devices to the seafloor and pointed them toward the surface. Ever since then, the devices have recorded the passage of fish above them. The initial set of data looks promising, and if the technology works, scientists could use it in the future to augment traditional, ship-based fish surveys.

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