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    Florida Chef Wins 2014 Seafood Cook-Off

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    Healthy Habitat: Key to U.S. Seafood and Fisheries

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    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

You might think that fresh fish is superior to frozen fish. But today, most frozen fish compares in quality to fish that’s never been frozen. Fresh catches are immediately processed and frozen at very low temperatures, and this often happens right on board the vessel where the fish is caught. When shopping for frozen seafood, there are several things you can do to ensure you get the best product possible.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Small fish play a big role in the marine food chain. River herring in the Northeast United States, while a small fish, are an important prey species for many commercial and recreational fish species, and like all fish, they require healthy habitat to survive and reproduce. That’s why NOAA Fisheries scientists are working with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the state of Maine to enhance fish passage and improve habitat quality for river herring. As a result, researchers hope an increase in the river herring population in the Gulf of Maine will have a positive impact on stock rebuilding and sustainability of important New England groundfish fish stocks.

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