• Florida Chef Wins 2014 Seafood Cook-Off

    Florida Chef Wins 2014 Seafood Cook-Off

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    Healthy Habitat: Key to U.S. Seafood and Fisheries

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    NOAA Reports Show Strong Continued Improvements

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    Get To Know Your Seafood

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The U.S.—A Leader in Sustainable Seafood


The United States is a recognized global leader in responsibly managed fisheries, aquaculture, and sustainable seafood. From Alaska to Maine to Texas, U.S. seafood is responsibly harvested and grown under a strong monitoring, management, and enforcement regime that works to keep the marine environment healthy, fish populations thriving, and our seafood industry on the job. Helping everyone—from chefs to consumers—understand sustainable seafood is important. Through FishWatch, we provide easy-to-understand facts about the science and management behind U.S. seafood and tips on how to make educated seafood choices.

Sustainability Facts

You might be wondering, what’s a stock assessment, anyway? A stock assessment is the process of collecting, analyzing, and reporting demographic information to determine changes in the abundance of fishery stocks in response to fishing and, to the extent possible, predict future trends of stock abundance. Managers use stock assessments as a basis to evaluate and specify the present and probable future condition. Conceptually, this is similar to NOAA’s National Weather Service dynamic atmospheric models, which use multiple weather observations to calibrate complex atmospheric models that forecasters can use to make informed predictions.

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Fresh Facts Smart Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

Science Behind Seafood

How can a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) help support rockfish populations on the West Coast? There are many species of rockfish, some of which are threatened or endangered. But they often resemble each other, making it difficult to protect the vulnerable populations. Scientists are using a ROV in Puget Sound to survey and estimate rockfish populations and collect information on the species’ range and habitat use. By studying the fish in the water rather than bringing them to the surface, the risk of harm is much less for these vulnerable species. Rockfish can live to be 100 years old, so scientists also hope the ROV will help determine age by measuring the length of individual rockfish. All this information will support future research and plans to protect and recover rockfish populations.

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